Friday, December 30, 2005

Why I write erotica, Erotica vs Porn

"Erotica does not glorify our sexual domination of women. It expresses our wish that women didn't have sexual domination over us."
Jack Kammer

I am often asked why I write “porn”. I have to explain that I do not see “porn” and erotica as the same thing and what I write is erotica. I do believe there is a difference between porn and erotica. Sometimes there is a huge gaping chasm between porn and erotica where a line can clearly be seen, other times there is a fine line and some gray areas where it may not be as easily defined, but none the less I see a lot of differences between porn and erotica. I know some view anything sexual as smut or porn while others can relish the differences between them and all the areas in between. To me porn is usually visual and geared towards men. Its sole purpose is to physically arouse and stimulate. I have nothing against porn, it serves its purpose, but erotica goes much deeper. Erotica appeals more to women and is often written by and for women.

To me erotica can be much more real, while porn is often very unrealistic. Erotica can also tell a more complete story. If you read a regular novel about a married couple or a couple in love, it does not tell the whole story of their relationship because the sex scenes are often omitted or glossed over. In erotica you can get the whole story including the steamy sex scenes. Erotica stimulates the mind and the body, arousing emotions and the imagination. I love to picture the characters and see them in my mind, watch the stories take shape and unfold. With porn it is all laid out, no imagination involved unless you take the time to imagine yourself in the scene. Erotica often has more depth with characters that are more realistic.

Many writers, publishers and others have been discussing the differences between erotica and porn.

By eroticaforher at http://www.weterotica.blogspot.com/
blog titled “Smut By Any Other Name”

While some feel that erotic works are limited to "literature or art intended to arouse sexual desire" I find these creations anything but limiting. Being female, I find the skillful arrangement of words anything but limiting.As a human, I find arousal and it's sweet release the opposite of limiting; it is limitless.Those who dismiss erotica as "of no literary or artistic value other than to stimulate sexual desire" must somehow feel orgasm constraining. To this, I can neither agree, nor relate. There is proof of pleasure; even science shows us endorphins. And I'd rather get my free high from my genitals than a run.But I digress.To truly agree on definitions of erotica, and specifically written erotic works, one invariably turns to the comparison, the semantic debate, or "Erotica Vs. Pornography."
My definition of erotica, in as much as you will need for this blog, is:Exhilaration and euphoria achieved through the skillful application of words in well crafted sexual stories.


From suite101.com
Writing Erotica: Sex Sells with
Linda Orlando

What is erotica? What is the difference between erotica and pornography? These are a couple of the questions that will be answered in this section of our lesson. In addition, we will look at word choices that could best convey the sensual, sexual scene you have in mind.
Erotica may be thought of as a literary or pictorial portrayal that arouses or sexually stimulates using soft, sensual imagery. Examples of erotica may include the material found in Playgirl’s “Reader’s Forum”, classic novels like Jong’s Fear of Flying, D.H. Lawrence’s Lady Chatterly’s Lover, or contemporary stories like those written by Caleb Knight, RJ Masters, or Lonnie Barbach.
Erotica is stimulating fiction that is often included with equally-stimulating pictures. Erotica includes foreplay, intimacy, and a mutually-satisfying experience. It serves to gradually arouse the reader, giving the reader the sensation of almost “being there”.
Pornography, on the other hand, is considered to be far more “hard core”, more of the “wham-bam thank you ma’am” scenario. Pornographic material is more controversial, more likely to be sold in specialty adult bookstores, or in sealed plastic at the newsstand.
The primary difference between erotica and real pornography is that pornography has little or no socially redeeming characteristics and is intended to arouse the prurient interests of its readers. Pornography is generally less art and more degrading.
Keep in mind, however, that people’s perception of what is erotic and what is pornographic is relatively subjective and very political. Approach any discussions of pornography and censorship with an open mind. Be willing to listen to the views of others, even though you may not agree with them.




From Erotica Readers & Writers Association
Erotica versus Porn discussion


From cng
Erotic vs. Porn? Porn is thrown at the reader, the viewer. By that I mean the subjects are playing to the audience. Erotic draws the reader, the viewer into the role, the situation, the scene. I seem to think that porn caters more to a shallow, unimaginative male audience, where eroticism seems to please the more intelligent female audience. Years ago it used to be a thin line between porn and erotic by most people's standards. Today I see a very distinct line between erotic and porn, even when erotic can be just as, if not more so explicit than cheap porn. It is the manner in which it is presented.

From Cat Scarlett
I write erotic novels for Nexus in the UK. I have often been accused of writing porn by people who see any sort of sexual or sensual writing as morally reprehensible dirty books, in other words, for dirty people.
Personally, I delight in creating real people in a real world having real sex with each other. These people are not 'making love' in my novels or opening up spiritually to each other. They are having sex and more often than not kinky sex. The sort of forbidden skin-tingling sex we would all be secretly thrilled to get if there were no price tags attached. They learn about themselves through their sexual experiences, it's true, but only in the same way that everyone does. Because they're real people to me.
So does that make my novels pornographic? As most people have rightly pointed out, it depends on your definition. If erotica for you is about being flowery and keeping it all in the mind, then my writing is porn. But if you see porn as reducing people to homogenised sexual objects - "this goes in there, and then that goes in there" - then my books must be erotica.
So what do I do when people accuse me of writing filthy pornography? (My own father, as a recent example.) I smile at them sympathetically. Poor things. It must be dreadful to be so terrified of your own sexuality that you can't let anyone else enjoy theirs
.

I guess erotica is just like beauty, in the eyes of the beholder, for everyone will see something different.

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